A Travellerspoint blog

By this Author: Bruco

Martina Franca markets in Puglia, Italy

a really good selection of fresh local produce in the corner of massive clothing markets

Wednesday is market day and the crowds flock into town for the event which runs from about 8 a.m. until 1p.m. It occupies a large part of the town and most major roads are either closed or snarled so if you aren’t going to the market don’t go to Martina on a Wednesday.

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It’s a colourful spectacle as well as a good place to shop as prices are lower than most supermarkets and shops though quality throughout the market especially in the fruit and veg . Im sure a lot of the stalls move between the towns of Puglia and the range of produce was awesome. Mushrooms like i have never seen, cheeses including the local Barata, a mozarella with a creamy centre that is sooo delicious. Olive oils, all local, most organic, the freshest vegetables, pastas of all shapes and sizes. Meats from the local cattle.
. Here is a selection of images from the food markets in Martina Franca

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Here is a list of when and where every market takes place in Puglia.
Every day
Altamura, piazza Matteotti. Mainly fruits and vegetables
Taviano, fruits, vegetables and flowers
Mondays
Andria, Vieste,Lecce ,Laterza
Tuesdays
Monopoli, piazza Vittorio Emanuele
Sant'Agata di Puglia, corso Vittorio Emanuele II
Morciano di Leuca, piazza San Giovanni,Massafra
Wednesdays
Palo de Colle, corso Garibaldi,Manfredonia, via Scaloria,Gallipoli, viale Bari,Martina Franca, campo Boario and piazza d'Angio
Thursdays
Alberobello,Brindisi,Mattinata,Porto Cesareo,Grotteglie, via Marconi
Fridays
Locorotondo, via Roma and corso Garibaldi,Torchiarolo,San Giovanni Rotondo, corso Nazionale,Taurisano,Faggiano, via Scandebeg
Saturdays
Castellana Grotte,Ceglie Messapico ,Apricena,Matino,Monteparano
Sundays
Casalvecchio di Puglia

Other than food there are streets of clothing stalls, and how the local shops compete is beyond me, although the market stalls are very local in the fashion stakes.
We checked the markets on Thursday at Alberobello, and they were smaller overall , but still worth a visit. Hhere was our lunch as a result of the markets;
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Here is a recipe from Italy Magazine that sums up the best lunch one cold hope for once you find the local cheese, Burrrata
Burrata is a special fresh cheese originally from Puglia. It has a solid mozzarella-like shell and filled with a mixture that resembles both milk and mozzarella. It is what I like to consider, a treasure chest of creamy fat for cheese lovers. Burrata means "buttered" in Italian and it is very true to the word. It seems like the most buttery soft, creamy cheese you will lay your palate on. It is very versatile and can be used in pastas, it is especially decadent as a ravioli filling which is usually known for being filled with a leaner ricotta cheese. On it's own - it is quite buttery and creamy. Topped with a touch of marinated sun-dried tomatoes, it becomes a contrast of beautiful flavors with tangy tomatoes and aromatic herbs which these seemingly candied dried fruits are usually marinated with. An appetizer like this begs for a wine which will not compete with this melange of flavors but that will actually compliment them. I suggest a white wine or a sparkling wine with high acidity to hold up to the rich fats in this flavorful appetizer. It is fun to play with gastronomic identity when organizing meals and dishes. Burrata comes from Puglia and sun-dried tomatoes are very common in southern Italian eating. I would have suggested a white wine from Puglia to stay in the territory, however white wines from Etna have bright, nutty notes with remarkable acidity thanks to the pH in the area's volcanic soil. You could just as well pick a red wine, such as a Primitivo from Puglia with balanced acidity and tannin which fatty cheeses like Burrata also pair finely with. - See more at: http://www.italymagazine.com/recipe/crostini-burrata-cheese-and-sun-dried-tomatoes#sthash.CE0Qbw4m.dpuf
Preparation
Slice 4 pieces of bread longways about ½ inch thick, or thicker to your liking. Lightly toast in the oven or on the grill. Slice cheese into 8 portions. Since Burrata has a creamy center, don't worry if they don't come out to slices like with mozzarella. Cut each slice of toasted bread in half if your pieces are long. Drizzle toasts lightly with olive oil. Lay burrata chunks on top with a spoon to get all the creamy interior. Slice each sun-dried tomato longways to create 3 strips and lay on top of burrata toasts. Serve 2 pieces per person to serve 4 people as a light appetizer. Finish with salt and pepper if desired. Wine Pairing: Etna Bianco from ValCerasa
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Posted by Bruco 23:43 Archived in Italy Tagged food markets in italy wine seafood farmers cheese pasta martina frança Comments (0)

THE BOROUGH MARKETS London

The oldest and best Farmers Markets in London

Borough Market is London’s most renowned food market; a source of exceptional British and international produce.

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It is a haven for anybody who cares about the quality and provenance of the food they eat - chefs, restaurateurs, passionate amateur cooks and people who just happen to love eating and drinking.

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But it’s not just the sheer quality of the food on offer that makes Borough Market special – it is also about the people and the place. The market is populated by a community of remarkable individuals from all over the UK, Europe and the rest of the world, all of whom care deeply about the food and drink on offer. Many of the stallholders are themselves producers – people who grow, rear or bake the food that they sell. Others are importers with intimate knowledge of whichever corner of the globe they source their products from.

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As a result, the market has become a vast repository of culinary knowledge and understanding. It’s a place to explore, to ask questions, to discover new flavours and to savour a unique atmosphere.
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Borough has long been synonymous with food markets and as far back as the 11th century, London Bridge attracted traders selling grain, fish, vegetables and livestock. In the 13th century traders were relocated to what is now Borough High Street and a market has existed there ever since.

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In 1755, the market was closed by Parliament, but a group of Southwark residents raised £6,000 to buy a patch of land known locally as The Triangle, once the churchyard of St Margaret’s, and reopened the market in 1756. The Triangle, where you’ll find Northfield Farm and Furness Fish and Game, is still at the heart of the market today.
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The market still feeds this core community and has grown to over 100 individual stalls. Alongside the original fruit, veg, bakers and butchers we now sell a huge variety of British and international produce.

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All of our traders share a love of food and many of them make, grow or rear the produce they sell so now, just as in 1755, our customers know exactly where their shopping has come from.

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The market ensures high standards of produce by employing a food quality panel of impartial experts who ensure that the taste, provenance and quality of foods sold here are all regularly measured and maintained and we support small traders to meet these standards.

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With its vibrant and friendly atmosphere, Borough Market will always be at the heart of the local community. Its unique standing within the area has recently been marked by a Blue Plaque, voted for by the people of Southwark, marking its place as London's Oldest Fruit & Veg Market.

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Borough Market's gourmet food market consists of more than 100 stalls and stands. Producers from all over the country bring a range of fresh produce to the market, including fish, meats, vegetables, ciders, cheeses, breads, coffees, cakes and patisseries. Other stalls specialise in produce imported from abroad.

The market is open from Monday to Saturday. The full market operates from Wednesday to Saturday. On Mondays and Tuesdays, shoppers can find hot food traders, and fruit and vegetable stalls.
This information has been supplied by Borough Markets so check times before you go. Suffice to say i could have spent the day there, but that's me, I love these markets.
If you are into bread making find the breadmaking classes Bread Ahead sees two baking talents using their loaf: Justin Gellatly, formerly head of St John Bakery, and Matt Jones, founder of Flour Power. With its own stall in Borough Market, selling delicious rye sourdoughs, doughnuts and other treats, Bread Ahead also has its bakery in the market. Courses include a sourdough workshop, basic bread lessons and Italian breadmaking. But book ahead, its incredibly popular, its on my agenda , next trip !!

About the author: Since 1999, Bruce White has been traveling Italy, returning every year to a different region with pre-planned wine and food experiences. Some have been with food and wine tour operators in small groups, some planned directly with local Slow Food members to ensure something very local and very special. With this network of contacts and a desire to return as often as possible, Bruce launched Wine and Food Traveller to share wine and food experiences with those who have the same passion for the Italian Lifestyle , Slow Food , and travel

Posted by Bruco 23:05 Archived in England Tagged food london and market italy tours wine slow farmers cheese foodtours wineandfoodtoursitaly locavore Comments (0)

THE BOROUGH MARKETS London

surely the best Markets in London

Borough Market is London’s most renowned food market; a source of exceptional British and international produce.

IMG_3524.jpgIMG_3526.jpg

It is a haven for anybody who cares about the quality and provenance of the food they eat - chefs, restaurateurs, passionate amateur cooks and people who just happen to love eating and drinking.

IMG_3522.jpgIMG_3517.jpg

But it’s not just the sheer quality of the food on offer that makes Borough Market special – it is also about the people and the place. The market is populated by a community of remarkable individuals from all over the UK, Europe and the rest of the world, all of whom care deeply about the food and drink on offer. Many of our stallholders are themselves producers – people who grow, rear or bake the food that they sell. Others are importers with intimate knowledge of whichever corner of the globe they source their products from.

IMG_3516.jpgIMG_3507.jpgIMG_3496.jpgIMG_3497.jpg

As a result, the market has become a vast repository of culinary knowledge and understanding. It’s a place to explore, to ask questions, to discover new flavours and to savour a unique atmosphere.
IMG_3494.jpgIMG_3493.jpgIMG_3491.jpgIMG_3490.jpg

Borough has long been synonymous with food markets and as far back as the 11th century, London Bridge attracted traders selling grain, fish, vegetables and livestock. In the 13th century traders were relocated to what is now Borough High Street and a market has existed there ever since.

IMG_3489.jpgIMG_3477.jpg

In 1755, the market was closed by Parliament, but a group of Southwark residents raised £6,000 to buy a patch of land known locally as The Triangle, once the churchyard of St Margaret’s, and reopened the market in 1756. The Triangle, where you’ll find Northfield Farm and Furness Fish and Game, is still at the heart of the market today.
IMG_3467.jpgIMG_3466.jpgIMG_3464.jpgIMG_3456.jpg

The market still feeds this core community and has grown to over 100 individual stalls. Alongside the original fruit, veg, bakers and butchers we now sell a huge variety of British and international produce.

IMG_3450.jpgIMG_3452.jpgIMG_3453.jpgIMG_3455.jpg

All of our traders share a love of food and many of them make, grow or rear the produce they sell so now, just as in 1755, our customers know exactly where their shopping has come from.

IMG_3449.jpgIMG_3483.jpgIMG_3487.jpgIMG_3495.jpg

The market ensures high standards of produce by employing a food quality panel of impartial experts who ensure that the taste, provenance and quality of foods sold here are all regularly measured and maintained and we support small traders to meet these standards.

IMG_3513.jpgIMG_3505.jpgIMG_3500.jpgIMG_3484.jpg

With its vibrant and friendly atmosphere, Borough Market will always be at the heart of the local community. Its unique standing within the area has recently been marked by a Blue Plaque, voted for by the people of Southwark, marking its place as London's Oldest Fruit & Veg Market.

IMG_3459.jpgIMG_3463.jpgIMG_3462.jpgIMG_3480.jpg

Borough Market's gourmet food market consists of more than 100 stalls and stands. Producers from all over the country bring a range of fresh produce to the market, including fish, meats, vegetables, ciders, cheeses, breads, coffees, cakes and patisseries. Other stalls specialise in produce imported from abroad.

The market is open from Monday to Saturday. The full market operates from Wednesday to Saturday. On Mondays and Tuesdays, shoppers can find hot food traders, and fruit and vegetable stalls.
This information has been supplied by Borough Markets so check times before you go. Suffice to say i could have spent the day there, but thats me, I love these markets.
If you are into bread making find the breadmaking classes Bread Ahead sees two baking talents using their loaf: Justin Gellatly, formerly head of St John Bakery, and Matt Jones, founder of Flour Power. With its own stall in Borough Market, selling delicious rye sourdoughs, doughnuts and other treats, Bread Ahead also has its bakery in the market, and will launch its bakery school there in mid-February. Planned courses include a sourdough workshop, basic bread lessons and Italian breadmaking. But book ahead, its incredibly popular, its on my agenda , next trip !!

Posted by Bruco 23:05 Archived in England Tagged food markets london local market artisans wine farmers restaurants.bread Comments (0)

Brisbane's Jan Power City Markets

midweek markets in Brisbane, in the heart of the city.

These markets have grown into a very popular go to spot for local Restaurateurs to select local produce for their city based outlets.
Jan Power runs a number of successful markets around Brisbane, this one being the best in the city, and the only midweek market.
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Jan Powers Farmers Markets in Brisbane City are located on George St end of the Queen Street Mall, in front of the Treasury Casino at Raddcliffe Place every Wednesday from 10am till 6pm!

The Brisbane markets bring the country to the city with farm fresh fruit and veg, fresh juices, ginger beer, popcorn, honey, bread, biscuits, bagels, fresh pasta, hot smoked salmon, meat, seafood, small goods and of course hot foods from around the world.. Forget soul food, enjoy Soil food in the city every Wednesday.

Every Wednesday morning, whiles the city sleeps. Jan Powers Farmers Markets Staff usher in an array of farmers, chefs and artisans into the square at the river end of the Mall in Brisbane setup their wares to provide the best produce in Queensland.

Each stall is hand picked by the Jan Powers team, to showcase Brisbane’s finest fresh produce. Foods from many nations, from paella to pineapples, bagels to baklava, sausages to spices. Loyal customers come from all over Brisbane for their weekly fresh produce.
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Be sure to see the Gnocchi Gnocchi Bros stand , for some great Italian delicacies, but get there early they always sell out. Ben and the Benfatti team can also be found at the Powerhouse markets in New Farm park, just check the dates.

Posted by Bruco 22:41 Archived in Australia Tagged food markets local in by close italian brisbane farmers produce gnocchi brisbane. Comments (0)

Brixton Markets London

Brixton Village & Market Row for food markets with incredible choice of cuisines

Brixton Market comprises a street market in the centre of Brixton, south London, and the adjacent covered market areas in nearby arcades Reliance Arcade, Market Row and Granville Arcade.
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This bustling little corner of Brixton is a community within itself, featuring more than 100 local and independent businesses who have transformed this old arcade. Wandering through the covered walkways will reveal a treasure trove of cuisines, fresh produce, clothing, jewellery, homeware, art, and music. Honest Burgers originated within these walls and continue to flourish, here and across the city

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Brixton's cosmopolitan roots are reflected in its bustling market which has a huge range of food and clothes stores, many of West Indian origin.

The market was developed outside the BR railway station on Atlantic Road during the 1870s, and ran all along Electric Avenue. After the huge wave of immigration in the 1950s, the market became an important focal point for the black community, and still serves up West Indian specialties such as flying fish, breadfruit and all manner of weird looking fresh meats.

Nowadays, the market has expanded to cover several areas of Brixton.

Brixton Station Rd
Sadly struggling, this outdoor market mainly sells secondhand clothes and bric-a-brac with some electric goods of uncertain
Electric Avenue
The original market which was once protected by extended awnings running the length of the street. Mainly fruit and veg and clothes stores.

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Granville Arcade
Large covered market with an eclectic mix of shops including a tattoo studio, cafes, Caribbean bakery, several fishmongers and all kinds of unsavoury trays of animal produce. Not for sensitive veggies!

Market Row
Another big covered market with a large selection of stores including the superb Eco Pizza serving up Brixton's finest pizzas!.
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Reliance Arcade
A short and narrow covered market running between Brixton Rd and Electric Lane. Stalls include children's clothes, camera/watch shop and a vacuum cleaner spare parts store!

Station Arcade
Small selection of stores leading up the druggies favourite haunt, Brixton railway station.

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Tunstall Rd
New art market opposite Brixton tube.

Opening hours: Vary wildly, particularly for the outdoor markets in poor weather. Monday to Saturday, 10am till dark. Art market is open Sundays 11am to 5.30pm. Wednesday is half day closing at 1pm.

The Market began on Atlantic Road in the 1870s and subsequently spread to Brixton Road which had a very wide footway. Brixton then was a rapidly expanding London railway suburb with newly opening shops, including the first London branch of David Greig at 54-58 Atlantic Road in 1870, and London's first purpose-built department store, Bon Marché, on Brixton Road in 1877. The market was a popular attraction, with shoppers being entertained by street musicians.

Electric Avenue which is now part of the street market was built in the 1880s and was one of the first streets to have electric light. Glazed iron canopies covered the footpath, but these were significantly damaged by WW2 bombs, and finally removed in the 1980s. The song "Electric Avenue" was written by Eddy Grant referring to this area of the market.
now for dinner and there is plenty to choose from, west Indian, Indian, wine bars, creperies, but given my desire for Italian , as usual, we spotted Casa Sibilla, with a great little deli alongside this was heaven.
Casa Sibilla was an absolute gem for Italian cuisine. She also runs cooking classes and we spent a very pleasant couple of hours chatting all things Italian,
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The market arcades were built in the 1920s and 1930s when road widening on Brixton Road forced traders from their established pitches.

Reliance Arcade, 455 Brixton Road (c1924) provides a narrow pedestrian route from Brixton Road to Electric Lane. It incorporates the original Georgian house and has a beautiful Egyptian tomb facade to Electric Lane; it was extended forward by Ernest J Thomas in 1931. Inside there are small shops no larger than market stalls and a glazed roof provide the light.
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Reliance Arcade is Grade II listed, and was added to English Heritage's Heritage At Risk Register in October 2014.[4]

Market Row, 40 - 44 Atlantic Road was designed by Andrews and Peascod in 1928. It was built in the back yards of existing premises and links Atlantic Road, Coldharbour Lane and Electric Lane. The interior is double-height and windows in the roof provide light.
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Brixton Village, Coldharbour Lane was built as Granville Arcade in 1937 to designs of Alfred and Vincent Burr; the developer was Mr Granville-Grossman. It was opened by actor Carl Brisson on 6 May 1937. It has an interior of narrow covered streets called 'Avenues', and is double-height, similar to Market Row. There are over 100 shops. It links Coldharbour Lane, Atlantic Road and Popes Road.

The three market arcades in close proximity, forming an extensive network of stalls, are rare survivals and their special character is what marks out Brixton as distinctive from other suburban shopping centres: a mixture of history, interesting architecture, the variety of goods on sale and the cultural mix of Brixton, known as the symbolic 'soul of black Britain'.

Since 2011 the shops in Brixton Village and, more recently, Market Row and Reliance Arcade have increasingly converted into cafes and restaurants, serving a wide range of different cuisines. As a result, they are now open 8am – 11.30pm every day except Monday, when they shut at 6pm.

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In April 2010 the Secretary of State of the Department of Culture (DCMS) announced that the government had overturned its previous decision not award heritage protection to these three arcades and declared all three Grade II listed buildings. They were listed by virtue of their cultural importance and contribution to the social and economic history of Brixton, particularly since the 1950s as one of the principal hearts of the Afro-Caribbean community in London, as well as for their architectural importance since such arcades, once more common, are now rare.

Posted by Bruco 02:49 Archived in England Tagged food markets london world wine italian farmers casa markets.brixton brixton sibilla Comments (0)

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